Issue 09

A Marxist critique of post-Marxists

By James Petras

Introduction

“Post-Marxism” has become a fashionable intellectual posture, with the triumph of neo-liberalism and the retreat of the working class. The space vacated by the reformist left [in Latin America] has in part been occupied by capitalist politicians and ideologues, technocrats and the traditional and fundamentalist churches (Pentecostals and the Vatican). In the past, this space was occupied by socialist, nationalist and populist politicians and church activists associated with the “theology of liberation”. The centre-left was very influential within the political regimes (at the top) or the less politicised popular classes (at the bottom). The vacant space of the radical left refers to the political intellectuals and politicised sectors of the trade unions and urban and rural social movements. It is among these groups that the conflict between Marxism and “post-Marxism” is most intense today.

Links 09: Editor's introduction

'Democracy or death': Organising the Indonesian mass struggle

Following on from the theme of the last Links (“Class struggle in South- East Asia”) this issue begins by featuring an inside and in-depth look at the conditions for struggle of the Indonesian opposition to the Suharto dictatorship.
   Our interview with one of the long-term central leaders of the

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