Russia

Ilya Matveev — Alexei Navalny must be recognized for what he was: a giant of anti-authoritarian politics and nonviolent resistance.
How does the Russian left see the legacy of Alexei Navalny’s politics? What role has he played in the politicization of Russian society? What might his ultimate political legacy be? Three interventions from the left.
Suzi Weissman — Boris Kagarlitsky, the Marxist critic and thorn in the side of Putin’s regime, is now in their hands, and international solidarity is required.
The following statements have been issued by the Russian Socialist Movement in the wake of the death of opposition leader Alexei Navalny in prison and the jailing of socialist dissident Boris Kagarlitsky.
Hanna Perekhoda analyzes construction of Russian imperialist imagery of Ukraine, rooted in the Russian ruling elite’s drive to maintain its power.

Ukrainian feminist and socialist Viktoriia Pihul looks at the situation in Ukraine two years into Russia’s full-scale invasion. 

Nancy Fraser looks at how transfers of natural wealth and care fit within modern imperialism, the role expropriation continues to play in capital accumulation, and the increasingly blurred nature of core-periphery boundaries under financialised capitalism.

An interview with Oksana Dutchak, member of the Commons editorial team, as the two year anniversary of Russia’s invasion approaches.

Masis Kürkçügil explains how Erdoğan’s Turkey is seeking to carve out a path between the Western bloc and the West in order to build a second-rate imperialism. But this is not without difficulty in the context of exacerbated contradictions between the great powers.

The Social Movement stands for a just peace in the Middle East, which requires the elimination of structural oppression of Palestinians and systemic violence against the civilian population.

Harald Etzbach — While the states of the Global South publicly proclaim solidarity with Palestine, the reality is more complicated.

Given the recent marking of the centenary of Lenin’s death, Lars T Lih looks at what his ‘intricate polemic’ in ‘What is to Be Done?’ might offer today’s left.